Was Oscar Schindler a hero9

Whoever saves one life, saves the world entire

Was it greed or humanity that drove Oscar Schindler into history?

Was it greed or humanity that drove Oscar Schindler into history?
Later in 1963, he was named “Righteous Among the Nations” by the Israeli government. So, was he a hero? Or, he just did something humanitarian that none except his better half dared to do -living within the Nazi regime. It would be better to leave the matter in the hands of history while as a conclusion a Jew-proverb can be recalled — “Whoever saves one life, saves the world entire”.

Oscar Schindler at Plaszow

Oscar Schindler at Plaszow
During World War 2, millions of Jews died in the death camps, but Schindler's Jews miraculously survived Hitler's genocide. Moshe Rosenberg was one of them. In his great book The Boys - Triumph Over Adversity Sir Martin Gilbert tells how Moshe Rosenberg, then 16 years old, was being whipped one day at the KZ camp Plaszow by Nazi guards for daring to take a rest while road-building. After twenty-five lashes the whipping unexpectedly stopped. The boy looked up - and he saw Oscar Schindler. "I'll take care of this one," Schindler told the guards, and proceeded to drag the boy to a nearby stable.

Oscar Schindler with Nazi Officers

Oscar Schindler with Nazi Officers
Another time at Schindler's factory, during an inspection by Amon Goeth and his SS officers, the attention of the visitors was caught by the sight of the old Jew, Lamus, who was pushing a barrow too slowly across the factory courtyard, apparently utterly depressed. Goeth asked why the man was so sad, and it was explained to him that Lamus had lost his wife and only child a few weeks earlier during the liquidation of the ghetto. Goeth ordered his adjutant Grün to execute the Jew "so that he might be reunited with his family in heaven," then he guffawed and the SS officers moved on.

WW2: Are we ready to speak about the unspeakable war horrors yet?

WW2: Are we ready to speak about the unspeakable war horrors yet?
When one raise the topic of "Unspeakable War Horrors" and ask people what was the greatest one ever committed, about 9 out of 10 people would answer: The"Holocaust", which was perpetuated by the Germans under the command of Adolf Hitler, against the Jews. It is well known that the figure of 6 million, are mentioned as the total number of Jews, who died in the gas chambers of concentration camps like Auschwitz.

A closer look at the numbers of the Holocaust concentration camps

A closer look at the numbers of the Holocaust concentration camps
The nineteenth century started with a brilliance that’s as bright as the summer's morning sun. Advancements in technology and industrialization paved bright highlights in what many saw as a century with a bright future and potential. Successes were chalked and progress seemed a possible reality. Cities and countries were getting closer and networked as produce and labor got carried easily by the ever expanding railway network of the time. Unfortunately when things were about to get real about the nineteenth century dream until a huge obstruction came to hinder the progress of what many saw as the beginning of a new era.

Did Oscar Schindler’s factories purposely make dud bombs?

Did Oscar Schindler’s factories purposely make dud bombs?
Millions of people recognize Oscar Schindler because of the popular novel and film: Schindler's List. That detailed story discusses how he rescued Jews from the impending Holocaust during World War II. But Oscar Schindler had another profound influence over the lives of people during that era. He owned and operated his factory that produced bombs for Nazi Germany. That made him an influential industrialist in his own right. However, there is debate about whether his bombs were designed to fail. That could shed new light on the role he really played during World War II, and you’ll find out where Oscar Schindler purposefully made these dud bombs.

Leon Leyson was just a skinny kid

Leon Leyson was just a skinny kid
Leon Leyson was just a skinny kid during World War II but he was chosen to work for Oscar Schindler, though he was so little that he couldn't reach the handles on the machine. He used to stand on an upside-down box. Schindler developed a fondness for him, nicknaming him little Leyson and showing him many kindnesses. Leyson later recalled: "Occasionally, when he was by himself, he would come and talk to me. He ordered that I get extra rations of food .."